55 Comments

  1. Carolyn
    December 30, 2016 @ 3:39 pm

    Another great video! I was just checking circulars this morning and found babanas highlighted as a “produce pick of the week” at Aldi, one of my favorite stores for produce. They were advertised at .59 per pound – but hey, they’ve been .49 per pound for quite some time now! Just because it’s highlighted, doesn’t mean it’s a good deal…

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      December 30, 2016 @ 3:44 pm

      Thanks Carolyn! And you hit it right on the money – good catch on the circular!

      Reply

    • Valerie
      December 30, 2016 @ 2:10 pm

      I think if you look at the circular, I think the 59 cents was for organic bananas – just bought the regular bananas today at Aldi for 44 cents/lb. I’m guessing that prices vary depending on where you live (I’m in NC), but I know the bananas on sale this week were for organic.

      Reply

      • Cheryl
        December 30, 2016 @ 8:40 pm

        I believe you’re right, Valerie. I work at an Aldi in NY, and the everyday price of regular bananas is 44ยข/lb.

        Reply

    • Judy Evans
      December 30, 2016 @ 2:16 pm

      Thank you Tiffany,

      I have just watched the 2 videos on Grocery store Boot Camp. They were wonderful. I have received your e-mails for awhile but have not really had the time to sit down and enjoy the knowledge you were sending. I did, however, watch these 2 videos with great interest and totally enjoyed them. They were packed with so much information I feel like I am ready to go shopping with new interest and lots more knowledge. I am almost excited to go shopping!!!

      Please keep more videos coming. They are really helpful and I promise to read your e-mails thoroughly!

      Judy Evans

      Reply

      • Tiffany
        January 2, 2017 @ 11:51 am

        Judy, your comment was such a blessing. More videos are on the way!

        Reply

  2. Susan
    December 30, 2016 @ 3:44 pm

    Thank you so much for this video series! I am a Weight Watcher, taking steps towards a whole food/real food/clean eating lifestyle. While my local options are somewhat limited, I am sourcing most of our food from online or CSA boxes or our own garden in the summer, with fewer and fewer trips to conventional grocery stores. I know that this type of food costs more item per item, but the health benefits are so obvious and compelling that I’m willing to pay what i have to, and doing the research to find the best prices for the foods we choose to eat.

    Paying more for these foods has some surprising benefits, too — I am much more careful about using every last bit (not wasting the crumbs!), and about meal planning and not overeating. And whole foods are so much more satisfying than franken-foods!

    I do enjoy your blog, and again thank you for this series!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      December 30, 2016 @ 3:50 pm

      You’re so welcome Susan!

      Reply

  3. Nan
    December 30, 2016 @ 4:01 pm

    Thank you Tiffany, for sharing your wisdom

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:51 am

      You’re welcome Nan!

      Reply

  4. Sam
    December 30, 2016 @ 4:09 pm

    Awesome. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:57 am

      You’re welcome!

      Reply

  5. Miriam Kearney
    December 30, 2016 @ 4:26 pm

    I have followed your journey for a few years now and am always impressed by how little you spend on groceries. I too have used and stopped using coupons. I do use price matching – where my favourite grocery store will match just about any advertised price, however since I rarely buy anything except tomatoes an beans in a box or can, there aen’t as many of those.

    I am tempted to take your bootcamp course but I have some dietary (for health reasons) restrictions that usually get the in the way of cutting costs like most people do – my family is both gluten free and we follow a low-carb-high-fat eating style. That means that many ‘cheap’ meals like pasta based ones or using root vegetables to fill out the meal don’t work for us.

    Also – just a quick comment on gas points – in our area there is no such thing as cheapest gas – within less than a part of a penny all the gas stations charge the same. What we have done is use a credit card (which we pay off each month) for virtually all our expenses and this card gives us 2 cents of the price of gas plus points. We use the points to ‘purchase’ a 10 cents off discount card and get in effect 12 cents off each litre of gas we buy. Since the station is on our regular route we don’t go out of our way to get gas. You might say we are spending more (theoretically since we use a credit card) but we make a budget and stick to it even though we use a card. Maybe we could set a lower budget and that’s where your bootcamp comes in.
    You’ve said that your strategies work for everyone – will it work within our restrictions?

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      December 30, 2016 @ 5:04 pm

      Thank you for your kind words Miriam! To answer you question – YES! I’ve purposely designed this course to work within any restrictions: dietary, allergies, taste preferences, income, high cost of living… I wanted to make sure that everyone could benefit from this course, regardless of their circumstances. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply

  6. donna brewster
    December 30, 2016 @ 4:32 pm

    Thank you! I want to share this with my adult children! I already move the sell price to look at the regular price. Some stores are tricky and I do avoid them I only shop there because it is close but mostly do without. I learned some things I wasn’t sure about and did question the sales. I live alone so now I don’t feel guilty about the big sales!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      December 30, 2016 @ 5:04 pm

      That’s so awesome Donna!

      Reply

  7. Chelsea R
    December 30, 2016 @ 5:34 pm

    Hi Tiffany, I’ve enjoyed your first two videos, they have really made me think. However, I live in Northern Canada in a small town where there is only two grocery stores, so not much options. I’m thinking that the sales you said to avoid, and the items in the first video you said to avoid are probably the same up here too??? Or is there a bigger difference I should be watching for (other than price). Thanks!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      December 30, 2016 @ 5:51 pm

      Hi Chelsea! The ideas behind both videos are valid just about everywhere. Having limited options locally effects price foremost, so it’s worth shopping around and online for the best deals!

      Reply

      • Judy
        January 2, 2017 @ 5:25 pm

        I’m in Canada, too, and find that some of these tips are good, but there’s a few that just don’t work here. One thing that I do is always do one big shop on the first Tuesday of the month, as that’s when the local stores have a Customer Appreciation Day and offer 15% off the total. I make a list, which is based on what we eat over the month, and 90% of the items are on that list. If I forget something, or someone tells me too late that I should have bought something, I evaluate whether we can do without it for the month or not. Also, the store I choose has a gas bar, and gives discount coupons for gas. When I’m really on the ball, I make sure to cut off the transaction when it reaches the maximum amount for a coupon, then start another transaction to get a second coupon. (So far the cashiers don’t care if I do that!)

        Reply

  8. Rosanne
    December 30, 2016 @ 10:53 pm

    I thought I was just being paranoid about Meijers putting the wrong item next to the sale sign, but I guess I wasn’t! It happens almost every single time. If there is a sale on say, shredded cheese, they ALWAYS have the wrong size right next to the sign. Sneaky, sneaky! Thanks too for the tip on the 10 for $10 items sometimes having the price increased. I didn’t know that!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      December 30, 2016 @ 12:55 pm

      Sneaky indeed! You’re welcome Rosanne!

      Reply

  9. Megan Smith
    December 30, 2016 @ 2:39 pm

    Thank you for your videos. I have been discovering some of these tricks recently too. I saw buy one get one free on pork loin recently. Because I started keeping a list of prices with me while I shop I realized they doubled the price of the pork loin for the “sale” and I was able to avoid it.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:52 am

      Great job Megan! It’s crazy how easy it is to think you’re getting a good deal. This is why I do all the shopping in my house – otherwise, my husband would come home with every.single.buy1get1 in the store.

      Reply

  10. Cheryl
    December 30, 2016 @ 4:05 pm

    Thanks so much for the videos! I have watched them both and they are wonderful!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      December 30, 2016 @ 4:21 pm

      Thank you Cheryl!

      Reply

  11. Yuliya
    December 30, 2016 @ 7:09 pm

    Hi, I was always wondering what’s up with stores selling exact the same item for different prices. For example, 46 oz. can of Dole pineapple juice is 2.48 in Walmart, and 2.99 in Harris Teeter. A Dole brand whole pineapple is 2.48 in Walmart, 2.99 in Harris Teeter and 4.99 in Publix. All 3 stores are within 2 miles of my house, same brand, why prices so different? I also noticed that Whole Foods charges 0.70 cents more than Harris Teeter for Kings Arthur Flour. I started comparing prices for exactly the same items from different stores.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:29 am

      The only word that comes to mind is profit ๐Ÿ™‚ Some stores are able to charge more, because some buyers will only shop at specific stores. Not to mention: brand recognition. Some may think the products that Whole Foods carry are of superior quality, whereas they are no different than what’s on the shelves at Walmart. It pays to watch your circulars and only buy what you need! Good eye Yuliya!

      Reply

      • Holly
        January 8, 2017 @ 8:04 pm

        FYI, Walmart is good at guerrilla marketing as in Walmart telling a company what price they will sell their product to Walmart at even if it is a loss for the company. The company then has the decision to lose money or not be put into one of the largest retailers. I remember reading about them doing this to vlasic years ago. Almost ruined the company.

        Reply

  12. Sharon
    December 30, 2016 @ 7:24 pm

    Thank you for this information. I am going grocery shopping in a few days and will definitely use this information.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:25 am

      You’re welcome Sharon! Good luck and let me know what you save!

      Reply

  13. Don C.
    December 30, 2016 @ 8:58 pm

    i feel great after seeing this 2nd video.i already knew most of the info. i ALWAYS figure out what deal is best and ifit’s something i wouldn’t usually buy i skip it. though some weeks i allow a few extras as a splurge

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:52 am

      Good job Don!

      Reply

  14. Sharon
    December 30, 2016 @ 8:59 pm

    I too have enjoyed your videos. I have for the most part bought my paper products else where. I did learn some new points so thank you

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:53 am

      Thanks for the compliment Sharon! Keep up the good work!

      Reply

  15. Bronda
    December 31, 2016 @ 5:21 am

    Thank you, Tiffany! You have obviously put a lot of thought, time, and effort into these videos. I appreciate how easy they are to understand, and the printables are a great reminder. I am looking forward to the next video in the series, as you show us how to go on offense in the grocery store!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:53 am

      Woo hoo! You are so welcome Bronda! I’m glad that you find them helpful!

      Reply

  16. Monica
    December 31, 2016 @ 10:41 am

    Great tips! I realize I need to be more skeptical and stick with my list- not “sales.” Thank for the information!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:54 am

      Let me know how it goes Monica!

      Reply

  17. Hope C Ware
    December 31, 2016 @ 3:34 pm

    Tiffany,

    Another great video. You have clearly done your research. You are a shopping ninja! My hat is off to you!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:54 am

      The best compliment yet… “a ninja!” Thanks Hope!

      Reply

  18. Rebecca
    December 31, 2016 @ 5:09 pm

    Thank you for doing this series! With the price of everything so ridiculously high it might seem hard to reign in your grocery budget. I am constantly explaining the “Buy 10 for $10” to my mom. She automatically thinks you have to buy 10 to get the deal. I hate deals that play with math because it means I have to stand there longer and play with the math because sometimes like you said it’s really not the better deal. With my daughter off at college this year and moving into her own town home next school year I can see many weekends spent helping her to maximize her dollar to minimize her budget for food. She has always gone to the store with me and has watched my methods but with this video series I will have some back up to help me help her! As for the gas points….we usually do buy gas at our grocery store only because of the points and it usually makes them the cheapest gas in town! I wish they did more double and triple points though!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:55 am

      Rebecca, it sounds like you’ve already planted the seeds for your daughter to shop wisely! She will go great! And kudos to you on the gas points; that’s one part of the game I haven’t quite figured out yet.

      Reply

      • Erika
        January 3, 2017 @ 9:01 pm

        To Rebecca

        you can tell your Mom the only time she has to buy 10 for $ 10 is when its sase must buy 10 on the
        the sale label

        Reply

  19. Christine
    January 1, 2017 @ 9:02 pm

    I shopped like you were with me today. Well, almost. I can’t say we are at the point of no convenience food. I did buy a few things that we use regularly that are convenience items, but I thought I did well. I used what I had to plan my dinners for the week and I stuck to my list. We have Wegman’s, which is new to us in MA. They do have very pricey and fancy prepared foods, but they also offer great bulk shopping prices like Costco would. I can already see how I can save money if I can make the time. Making the time to plan and shop as well as making dinner after working all day are my biggest worries!
    Thanks for the tips.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:56 am

      Great job Christine! You can always pull me up on your phone when you shop. “I have your back!”

      Reply

  20. Joanne scantlebury
    January 2, 2017 @ 12:41 am

    Hi Tiffany,
    Thanks again for a great video.
    Here in Australia the supermarkets use the same techniques as yours in America, but our food prices are higher than yours.
    I,Ve been fooled by so many of the sales tricks they use, but I’ll be watching more closely from now on.
    I look forward to the next video.

    Thanks so much
    Joanne scantlebury

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:56 am

      Joanne, please let me know how it goes and good luck!

      Reply

  21. Jolene J Talboom
    January 2, 2017 @ 10:00 am

    Great video! Thank you for sharing all the knowledge from your hard work! Meijer has buy 10 for $10 get 1 free often. Granted, it’s mostly junk food, but, I do agree, you have to know if $1 is a good deal for that item. Since our food budget is shrinking, I look forward to more videos.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:57 am

      Good eye Jolene! More videos are on the way!

      Reply

  22. Cheryl B.
    January 2, 2017 @ 11:57 am

    I think something really important is that it takes TIME to save money on food. My husband is a complete foodie and is very good at spotting good buys. A recent example: Costco had a $8 off coupon for pork loins, big pork loins! He looked for the smallest package, which made it the best buy. The smallest one he could find was for around $11, which made it around $3 for a large pork loin. He sliced chop sized pieces and ran them through a tenderizer he bought at Cabela’s. We figured out that we were getting two nice sized pork loin chops for less than 25 cents a piece. He then packaged them in appropriate sizes and vacuum sealed them. I think we bought a total of 6, some were cut into fairly large roasts, all vacuum sealed and froze. Vacuum sealing really works. We ate 3 year old frozen steaks a month or so ago and they were still good.

    An old high school friend brought by buckets of rabbit poo for our compost and we pulled several items out of our freezer in trade. One was a package of the pork. He could not believe how much we paid. We have never shopped for the week. We have always shopped to stock up which has saved us countless thousands over our 38 year marriage. Our very first purchase when we got married in 1978 was a chest freezer……even before a washer and dryer!

    My husband also makes our bacon and sausage. It is his hobby and we always have lots to give away. After a long drought in California, we are looking forward to growing a garden this summer. We have not had one for over 4 years!

    Good luck everyone…..going to make soup with veggies that need to be used. I am also on WW and it takes time to prep. You just have to accept it and find a way to enjoy it. One is to watch videos while working in the kitchen, like this one. I should say I have not done food for 35 years, have just started since retirement 7/8/16. My husband did it all starting in about year 3 of our 38 year marriage.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 10:38 am

      Yes, yes and yes! It does take time to save money. I relate it to “sweat equity” – like when you put the work into your house instead of hiring contractors to do it ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply

  23. Linda Dietz
    January 2, 2017 @ 4:43 pm

    Over the last few years I have become a “lazy shopper.” I’m sure this has cost us $! Your videos have helped me become re-energized and ready to jump back into the grocery saving game…and win big! The main thing I need to do is to plan meals. I have tried before but find myself too much of an emotional cook. Perhaps I have spaghetti planned for a certain night. When it comes time to begin the prep…I just may not feel like I want to eat spaghetti…much less cook it. So I shift gears and fix something entirely different that possible needs an item or two from the store! NOT GOOD! My goal is to do a week’s worth of meal plans and actually stick to them. Any tips offered would be welcomed!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 5:04 pm

      Linda, I think we all struggle with not wanting to eat what we’ve planned! One thing you might do, is only cook family favorites on certain nights of the week…. or even completely eliminate meals that you are “iffy” about. You could also have a few backup meals always on hand that are easy and frugal.

      One of our favorites is grilled cheese and tomato soup. We all love this meal in our household and it doesn’t take very long to make. We always get the kids involved and always keep these ingredients handy!

      Reply

  24. Jamie
    January 4, 2017 @ 10:31 am

    Eye opening!

    Reply

  25. Rachel
    January 9, 2017 @ 8:25 pm

    Hi Tiffany,

    I live in Australia so it’s always interesting to hear about other country’s shopping habits. It is now law that every price tag has the unit price listed (per item, per 100g, per 100mL, etc). I always use this to help me work out whether sales are worthwhile. I’ll sometimes buy a full priced item because it’s unit price is less that another item’s sale price. Having it all on the ticket saves so much time.

    Sometimes I’ll change the menu to take advantage of a special, but I’ve never really considered if its actually a great deal or not. I’ll definitely watch out for the sales more often and critically analyse them.

    While you might be jealous that we have unit pricing on all tickets, I’d love to pay only $1.25 for a dozen eggs!! We’re someone around $3.50 for the cheapest home brand cage eggs!!

    Reply

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