VIDEO 3: Learn the Strategies of a Smart Shopper

Be sure to leave a comment below!

Make Grocery Savings Simple by Never Buying These Things at the Grocery Store

Make Grocery Savings Simple by Ignoring the Sales that Aren’t Really Sales

Make Grocery Savings Simple by Using Specific and Smart Shopping Strategies

How to Make Shopping for Healthy Food Easier, Faster and Cheaper – Forever

66 Comments

  1. Charlotte
    January 2, 2017 @ 11:18 am

    Turning left when shopping makes a lot of sense. The most expensive, tempting items are on the right as I go in, fresh bread, exotic fruits and vegetables, etc. Plus, shopping for produce last, instead of first, means produce will be on top and I don’t have to keep re-arranging items in the cart and nothing will get crushed. Thanks for another great video.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 11:34 am

      Crazy isn’t it? You’re welcome Charlotte!

      Reply

    • Kim Fowler
      January 8, 2017 @ 9:13 pm

      Shopping clockwise, using my calculator and using a timer will help. Thank you!

      Reply

    • Brenda
      January 9, 2017 @ 8:25 pm

      Using a calculator. I’ve done this before, but then got lazy again!

      Reply

  2. Delphia
    January 2, 2017 @ 11:49 am

    Shopping clockwise/counterclockwise was helpful

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:20 am

      So glad it helps Delphia!

      Reply

  3. lynn maust
    January 2, 2017 @ 11:51 am

    I think the best thing I could do is shop clockwise…use my calculator….and set a time for 20 minutes….

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:21 am

      Totally agree!

      Reply

  4. Phyllis
    January 2, 2017 @ 12:17 pm

    I consider my self a frugal shopper but recently fell for the grocery store gimick of collecting stamps for free cookware. I figured I was doing my shopping there anyway why not collect the stamps and get the free cookware. I earned my free pan, but then realized it actually cost me $700.00 or more in grocery spending to get a free 8.5″ fry pan. I would have been much better off spending the $20.00 purchasing the pan than trying to make sure I had enought items in my basket each time I stopped to collect the stamps. I love the tips you are sharing in your Grocery Budget Bookcamp videos. Thanks so much.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:48 am

      Phyllis, it’s so easy to get caught up in the grocery store games isn’t it ? My mother in law and I used to get sucked into the Save Mart Monopoly style games in order to win prizes (big no no)…

      Great job recognizing what it “really costs” instead of what you think you’re paying. You’ll do great moving forward and always have grace on yourself!!

      Reply

  5. Pam
    January 2, 2017 @ 12:20 pm

    These videos are great! I’ve been a blog follower for awhile now, and I can honestly tell you that your tips and helps have saved me way more than anything else I have tried. This includes “extreme couponing”. Thanks so much!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:48 am

      Thanks Pam! Love your enthusiastic comment!

      Reply

  6. kj favreau
    January 2, 2017 @ 1:12 pm

    I have watched all 3 videos and am impressed. Nice job. I’ve learne a lot of your techniques over the years and they work. I love the left to right one, however, it does make it harder for me to focus believe it or not. Now that my chidren are gone and I’m only cooking for 2, I don’t use as many coupons, however, they are very useful for paper products at Walmart and sale items at CVS/Walgreen’s. I haven’t paid full price for soft soap, kitchen detergent, laundry detergent, cereal, etc. forever. I also collect coca cola caps and box ends for free coke.

    Thank you
    KJ Favreau

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:23 am

      Thanks for the compliments KJ, and I’m so glad that some of my tips have helped you! Great job for using coupons on paper products and toiletries – those are solid ways to save!

      Reply

  7. Teresa
    January 2, 2017 @ 1:27 pm

    I use the Pomodoro technique in my office and with housework but I *never* thought to use it for shopping. Brilliant!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:49 am

      Lol! You’re welcome!

      Reply

  8. Megan
    January 2, 2017 @ 1:35 pm

    I am definitely going to try using a timer and running total as lingering in the aisles is something I’m certainly guilty of. Thanks for these wonderful videos!

    Reply

  9. Kristina
    January 2, 2017 @ 2:45 pm

    I think that setting a timer will be the most beneficial because I get too caught up in looking at other things, or distracted by extras that it seems to take forever to shop.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 2, 2017 @ 5:01 pm

      Agree completely Kristina!

      Reply

  10. Sylvia
    January 2, 2017 @ 5:14 pm

    I have watched all 3 videos and think your tips and strategies are amazing. I only shop for two adults but every tip helps me be able to spend my money more wisely. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:49 am

      You’re welcome! Let me know how it goes!!

      Reply

  11. Jen
    January 2, 2017 @ 7:50 pm

    I have been following your blog for about 1 1/2 years as well as the meal planning you created. I am learning so much! I Love the timer and running total idea!!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:50 am

      Jen, thank you so much for being a subscriber! I’m so thankful to be able to serve you.

      Reply

  12. Delores
    January 2, 2017 @ 8:34 pm

    I am going to shop clockwise ( I think I do) but the biggie will be to set a timer.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:50 am

      Woo hoo! How funny would it be, if this idea caught on – then all the stores had to re-organize the aisles again?

      Reply

  13. Danielle
    January 2, 2017 @ 8:37 pm

    Ugh Kroger drives me nuts… I work at one of their division stores… they’re constantly moving things around the store… I’m guessing their strategy is to get people to look at other things when they go to get the item that they normally get and it’s not in that spot… People are constantly asking where things are because they’re always doing “resets” and removing things… and they too now place the same items in multiple places…sure they’ll say it’s to give customers more choices… but you know it’s a ploy to get you to spend more… even with my discount I pretty much refuse to shop there anymore because of the way
    they do things…

    Can’t wait for the next video…your tips are amazing…thank you so much for sharing your time with us

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:52 am

      Awwww thanks Danielle! You’re very welcome, and I’m glad that you find the videos useful.

      Regarding moving things around: yes, that’s such a pain. I remember sending my husband to the store for bread crumbs or anchovies and it took him 1/2 hour to find them because of the recent changes!

      Reply

  14. Christine
    January 2, 2017 @ 10:13 pm

    I love the grocery store music. All seventies and eighties soft rock. I have been singing along not realizing that I was spending extra money! The timer idea is great. I use it for household stuff, but I never thought to do it for groceries. Good reason to not bring the kids. Going the opposite way would be useful too. Thanks for the tips.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:52 am

      Lol, just don’t stay for the music! Otherwise, you’ll spend it all 🙂

      Reply

  15. Meaghan Miller
    January 2, 2017 @ 11:54 pm

    Best tip for me is: know your prices! This way I know when something is on a good sale (keep in mind your tutorial on sales gimmicks). I am pretty frugal and buy only the essentials, but I fall prey to canned beans, shredded cheese and buying cleaning supplies at my grocery store. I’ve got my work cut out for me to streamline my stores and habits. Thanks for all your help and I love your blog!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:53 am

      YES!

      Reply

  16. Joanne scantlebury
    January 3, 2017 @ 1:18 am

    Thanks once again for the great ideas.
    I started shopping the supermarket from right tto left here in Australia and it does seem to help, but that’s the onLy strategy I have used on your list.
    I,m off tomorrow so will try the timer idea and the upbeat music.
    I,m looking forward to the Budget Bootcamp.

    Joanne

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 11:53 am

      Great job Joanne, keep us updated!

      Reply

  17. Kathy Hutton
    January 3, 2017 @ 2:08 pm

    Best strategy make a menu for a month then a list, shop only from your list. Shop which ever way makes your produce last. Skip all aisles not needed. BUT if you are like me and find shopping your only relief from family and housework then you may like to shop slow, read labels, visit with other shoppers etc. I still only shop from and only from my list. But I relax and enjoy the experience, the music and people. I have been shopping for 40 years and have it down pretty good. Buy mostly the same items every month. But I think I will be trying to buy none grocery items other places. Never tried that before. Thanks for the advice

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 4, 2017 @ 7:35 am

      You’re welcome Kathy!

      Reply

  18. Kristi
    January 3, 2017 @ 2:46 pm

    Hi!

    Thank you for the tips! Do you think the course that you are about to offer works the same in other countries as well?
    I’m actually even wondering what exactly is a “grocery store”. I searched wikipedia for “box sotres”, I didn’t know before about what exactly they are, either, and I found out that some of them are called “hypermarkets” in Europe, and then I came to think that most of the stores where I shop for food and some other things seem to be the hypermarkets. And then there are smaller stores, where I shop for organic foods, and some of these items aren’t sold in any other stores, so I don’t seem to have many options when I want the specific thing. I do compare the prices of similar not same things in different stores and can choose then which price-to-product combination best fits me. I’m still kind of puzzled about what the “grocery store” is, though 😀

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 3, 2017 @ 4:05 pm

      Hi Kristi! I do think my course works in other countries, but you would have to figure out the equivalent of which stores are which first. 🙂 To help, a “big box store” is like a catch-all store that sells anything from laundry baskets to pots & pans to food to underwear. Walmart is a big box store here in the states, and it was originally a home good store, but eventually expanded to include food items.

      Reply

  19. Mary
    January 3, 2017 @ 3:41 pm

    This is wonderful. Thank you. One tip I have is to organize your list according to aisle. I do this and it saves me time because I’m not having to run back to get something I forgot (which is something I do all the time when I just make a quick list and run to the store!)

    Of course this means knowing your specific grocery store since they are all different.

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 4, 2017 @ 7:36 am

      OOooooohhh! That’s a great one! I never thought about organizing the list according to aisle…!!

      The only consideration with this, would be if they changed up the aisles 🙂 I’m not sure how often this happens though.

      Thanks Mary!

      Reply

  20. Danielle Knoper
    January 3, 2017 @ 8:21 pm

    I think the best tip for me was knowing all the different services a grocery butcher can potentially do for me. I often skip meat altogether because I simply do not like the effort and mess that goes along with preparing the raw meat at home. So I have been known to purchase the pre-cut meats at a higher cost just to avoid this. I will be asking my grocery butcher tonight what sorts of things they will be willing to do! Thank you!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 4, 2017 @ 7:16 am

      Yes! It’s amazing what the butcher can do for you, to help you cut costs 🙂

      Reply

  21. Rebecca
    January 4, 2017 @ 6:59 am

    I am loving your videos Tiffany! My family and I have cut out all processed food and sugars from our diet over the past six months and we love it! However, I am finding myself spending upwards of $1000 at the grocery store some months and we just cannot maintain that level of spending!
    I am trying your techniques but I shop at Aldi as my local Kroger is way too expensive. I save $3+ on just 1 pineapple when I go to Aldi over Kroger.
    My question is: Will your techniques and boot camp help me even though I am shopping at a discount grocery store? I also purchase all of my meat from Zaycon (an online pickup service) and get really good prices on a regular basis. I am just worried about getting my hopes up :(. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 4, 2017 @ 7:28 am

      Rebecca, I’m so proud of you for cutting out all processed foods and sugars. Sugar is one we still have trouble with, but mainly because of the occasional batch of cookies… 80/20 rule right?

      How large is your family? $1,000/mo. may be high, but it really depends on how many people you are feeding, the types of meals you are preparing, & where/how you are shopping. If you are shopping primarily at Aldi and Zaycon, I’d be interested in knowing what types of meals you are preparing on a regular basis, as in, are they meat centric – and for how many people.

      Grocery Budget Bootcamp should help anyone save money! We just put a focus/test group through the program, and quite of a few of our members are saving $200-325/month (that’s $2,400-$3,900 year)!!! Other testers who weren’t saving “as much” reported they were able to buy much more food with their money as opposed to before – which of course, translates into savings over the long haul. I will warn you, this course is hard work 🙂 In order to see results, you have to be willing to put in the time & effort!

      I completely understand the struggle Rebecca! I know what it’s like to struggle feeding my family, and to stay within budget. Hopefully these videos helped you, and if you think it’s a good fit, that Grocery Budget Bootcamp will be able to help you out even more 🙂

      Reply

      • Rebecca
        January 4, 2017 @ 2:29 pm

        Thank you for your reply! When I said we cut out sugar I meant processed sugars! I wish i could cut out sugar completely but it is so good and like you said 80/20 rule! Anyway, I am feeding a family of 4(ish) including my 6 month old and almost 2 year old. For my 2 year old I try to provide a variety of snacks throughout the day. Many are home made and include fresh fruit, veggies, wheat, baked goods and dairy products along with almond milk. For breakfast my husband and I have eggs, toast and fruit while my son has whole milk plain yogurt with frozen blueberries and whole wheat bread. For lunch, I have some type of salad I prepared ahead of time such as broccoli or black bean salad. My husband eats lunch meat everyday along with a granola bar and container of fresh veggies that I prepare weekly. My son has a veggie red sauce on pasta I cook and freeze ahead of time with some type of fruit.

        When it comes to dinner I am used to having meat as the main dish and do still struggle with changing that mentality. I try to offer two vegetables (at least one), fresh fruit, brown rice or beans and a meat option. Usually there is meat leftover that ends up tossed out because I feel it is not enough to make another meal from. Most of my meals are freezer meals because I find it difficult to cook with my children running around so most of our dinner is prepared in a crock pot or in advance. For example, on Sunday I will prepare a vegetable side dish to accompany any freezer meal I am making that week and they usually include at least one vegetable already. Any fruit we will be eating with our meal will be cleaned and ready to head to the table. 30 minutes before dinner is ready I will thaw any rice or beans that I have precooked in the freezer and then heat-up the vegetable on the stove that I made ahead on Sunday. Once those are reheated I fill the fruit bowls and dinner served! It’s a very effective way for my family to have a healthy meal that includes fresh fruits and vegetables without the nightly time commitment.

        Lastly, before my husband and I truly made the change to whole foods we struggled with the idea of eating less meat. Whenever we would have a meat-light meal we would both end up hungry later in the evening or not satisfied at all once we were finished with our meal. Now that I am adding in more vegetables and offering fruit with dinner (something I never did before) I could probably cut back the meat portion of our meal without leaving us feeling starved.

        Thank you for reading my questions and responses even though they are so long! It means a lot as everyone around me thinks I am crazy for how I am feeding myself and my family!

        Reply

  22. Melinda
    January 4, 2017 @ 11:09 am

    Thanks for the videos! Very informative! I want to try the timer idea and see how that would effect things. Also, the running total and listening to music ideas. I actually do a counter clockwise rotation in my store. The reason is that I try to start with the non cold items and them get the cold stuff last. One thing I was wondering though is that the tips you mention seem to be for a regular grocery store. I used to shop exclusively at Kroger and I would use your do not buy trips for sure there. But my little town got a Walmart about a year ago. And I had to repent for all the mean things I had said about walmart. It really has been soooo nice to have a grocery store within about a mile or two. Do all the tips apply to Walmart too? Mainly the do not buy lklist and the sales strategies?

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 4, 2017 @ 11:15 am

      Hi Melinda! The tips to apply to Walmart too, but they should be modified slightly because of the ways Walmart markets sales and set up their store. For example, they have monthly sales. In Dec their apples were advertised as $1.97/lb, but I knew that wasn’t a good deal b/c I had seen it for less elsewhere. Just have to keep an eye out and not assume that every “deal” is a good one!

      Reply

    • Rhoda
      January 5, 2017 @ 3:36 am

      Rebecca, Just a suggestion for the small meat portions you usually throw out as they aren’t enough to save for another meal–freeze them. When you have enough, add some black beans (or other bean of choice) and have beans and rice for dinner that night. My family wouldn’t mind the mixing of different meats in with their beans, but if that is a problem, save the different types of meat in different bags, and then use as that particular bag reaches a level that can be used. Also, if different sauces are used, that’s okay as black beans are pretty forgiving and blends well with salsa, spaghetti sauce, gravies, etc. Another way to blend the flavors–lots of cumin! One other idea– veggie soups can be made with more than one type of meat in it.

      Reply

    • Christine
      January 7, 2017 @ 10:03 pm

      Rebecca,

      Freeze all those left overs. You can make amazing soups with a little of this and little of that. I did it today. Left over veggies, pasta, meats and some broth. I sautéed an onion and some celery, added chicken broth and threw all my left overs in to the pot (taco meat, corn, pasta, chopped up steak, pureed carrots and tomatoes). It really was good. Just tiny little Tupperware containers of leftovers made a great meal.

      Reply

  23. Betty Ann Duzik
    January 4, 2017 @ 11:11 am

    The strategies give me a lot to think about the next time I go shopping.
    Some I already do some I will try.
    I like to use the big carts, will adjust to my list from now on.
    I already keep a running total already when I shop. I usually have a certain amount to spend, sometimes with a little cushion. When the kids were home I had $100 to spend on groceries, and that had to really stretch when I had to by meat (eased up some when they got into 4-H). Don’t buy most meat at the grocery store any more, usually from the local meat packing plant if we don’t have our own animals butchered. I actually did a lot more homemade baking/cooking back then, before I knew
    anything about reading labels and “eating healthy”. GMO’s started me on being more aware of what I serve my family. We have already cut out a lot of processed foods and sugar over the last several years.
    I have been learning a lot from you and other websites about real foods and budgeting (don’t do too well on the budget) .
    I wish I had known some of this years ago. Thanks for all the great information.
    Betty Ann <

    Reply

  24. Ann
    January 4, 2017 @ 11:48 am

    I’m DEFINITELY going to set a timer as well as use earbuds on my next shopping trip! In fact, I’ll use all of your techniques. I’ve had a tendency to mosey through the store looking for “deals”, but that’s not going to happen anymore! I also took a leap of faith and lowered my (very high) budget from $1,400 this month to $1,000. Another place that I have trouble getting “in and out” is the farmer’s market. It never fails that I buy something that I don’t need because I’ve struck up a conversation with one of my favorite farmers and feel obligated to purchase something from them! Although, I feel better about spending this money and fostering the relationships I have with my farmers, I really need to curb that habit. I can’t wait for more!! Thanks, Tiffany!

    Reply

  25. Pam
    January 4, 2017 @ 1:17 pm

    Hi Tiffany – Great series! Thank you! There were two things that I think will be most helpful for me. The first is using the butcher. I always thought the butcher was more expensive than the already cut meat, but noticed a few weeks ago that the prices were the same. I will definitely be using the butcher to cut my chickens, ribs and roasts. I am excited to try starting on the left side of the store and see what that will do for me.

    Reply

  26. Penny
    January 4, 2017 @ 4:00 pm

    I am loving the series. Some of the things I apply but definitely need to tighten up on. I haven’t thought to weigh the items to get the biggest/heaviest when the price is set. I do have a question though, do you include house hold items in your grocery budget or is that a separate category? You also commented earlier that the boot camp was pretty intensive. How time consuming is this estimated to be/take per se? I am definitely interested but the timing may not be the greatest for me right now. I am desperately needing to get a budget in place and I struggle with meal planning. These two are HIGH on my priority list. Also, real food is a must so I don’t use coupons as I once did (not the super couponer though). Thanks for all the great tips and hard work!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 4, 2017 @ 4:04 pm

      Hi Penny! I used to keep household items with my grocery budget until I really buckled down to get my food spending under control. If that’s your situation, I recommend having a separate line item. As for time involvement, it could be anywhere from 30 minutes to a couple hours each week. It depends on the lesson and thinking of one week in particular, your kitchen. 😉

      Reply

  27. Candace Marshall
    January 5, 2017 @ 4:09 pm

    Thanks for all the info and taking the time to help us out! I may be talking to the butcher 🙂

    I have a question regarding your course. Do the videos add info to the 13 core lessons or is it verbal communication of the 13 core lessons? If the videos add content, how much more?

    Thanks for your time!

    Candace

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 5, 2017 @ 4:26 pm

      Hi Candace! Yes the videos add to the core lessons. They’re based off the lesson, but they include more real life examples and off-the-cuff ideas I had when I tested the course with a focus group. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  28. Wanda
    January 6, 2017 @ 3:04 am

    Totally agree on shopping the other way around! I actually do this already. Because I’m in a wheelchair and only use the bags I can store on my powerchair my budget dropped with ease. When I realized that the non breakable items are in a different routing I decided to reroute my grocery shopping trips. And put a big dent in the budget again!

    I am so glad to find out this is actually the right way to shop. So thank you Tiffany!

    Reply

  29. Louise
    January 8, 2017 @ 4:09 pm

    Hi Tiffany, thank you for the effort you have put in your these videos. I think one thing I will definitely try is the clockwise route around the store. We are creatures of habit and tend to do things always the same. That will be on my list to try next. I tend to use a list whenever I go to any store and am not one to dilly-dally around, so time is not usually an issue for me. Only time I really have an issue is when my husband decides he wants to join me, which is not very often, thank goodness, as I always wind up spending more when he’s there!
    I’ve been on the AIP program for a year and a half, but my husband eats a regular diet, so it makes meal planning rather difficult as he doesn’t always like what I make. But meal planning is something I really need to incorporate into my routine. Any help in that direction would be great!
    Thank you again Tiffany.

    Reply

  30. Lael
    January 11, 2017 @ 5:55 pm

    Wow. Brilliant. All of it. I thought I was pretty well aware of my grocery store surroundings, but videos 2 and 3, especially 3 was greatly enlightening. Wowzers. The timer, fixed prices was a duh but never thought about it, listening to upbeat music. I loved it all!

    Reply

  31. Lael
    January 11, 2017 @ 6:10 pm

    I did have a question- for the butcher tip… are you only referring the store brand meats or could I ask them to also cup up let’s say Tyson bagged whole chix?

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 12, 2017 @ 6:37 am

      Hi Lael – just the store meats. You can definitely ask if they do brands, but my hunch would be no.

      Reply

  32. Kim Fowler
    January 13, 2017 @ 4:26 pm

    I haven’t been able to find the 4th video to the Grocery Bootcamp. Have you sent it yet?

    Reply

    • Tiffany
      January 14, 2017 @ 10:22 am

      Hi Kim! The 4th video was available for Jan 5-10. I hope to open enrollment for GBB again in the Spring, so keep an eye on your email!!

      Reply

  33. Heather Robertson
    March 9, 2017 @ 12:27 pm

    I tend to get in and get out quick, but I like the idea of timing myself to make sure I don’t browse too long on items I don’t need. Thanks for the tip!

    Reply

  34. Brenda
    March 20, 2017 @ 2:26 pm

    Hi Tiffany. I love these tips and your blog. I have never ‘gone left’ while grocery shopping so I am going to try that one and setting a timer on the next shopping trip. I have used a calculator many times, but had gotten a little lazy, so I’ll also use it on my next trip.

    I can’t wait for the next video. We’ve been on the road to eating real food for many years. And, we are always trying new things to help cut the rising costs of buying real, fresh and good food. Thanks again!!

    Reply

  35. Dorothy Warwaruk
    March 30, 2017 @ 1:23 am

    I wasn’t able to open up Video 1, 2, or 3. My computer would not allow me to work through it

    Reply

  36. Dorothy
    March 30, 2017 @ 10:52 pm

    Thank you for your videos. Some of your recommended techniques I have already been using. For instance one should not shop when hungry, because you will buy something that is not on the list. Using a list is very helpful. The idea of using a timer is interesting. I am going to try that technique. How many times I meant to go in and buy certain few things, but end up buying more. For that reason I always took a cart, rather than a hand basket.
    Your videos made me more aware of my shopping techniques, what I can change to make my shopping more effective, and save more money.

    Thank you!!

    Reply

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